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North Andover (978) 686-7623
Tewksbury (978) 640-1010

August 2021

Tuesday, 31 August 2021 00:00

Cuboid Fractures

The cuboid is a cube-shaped bone located in the middle of each foot. It functions as a supporting structure that stabilizes the foot and aids in moving the toes. Although somewhat rare, the cuboid bone can be fractured due to injury. Often cuboid fractures co-occur with other problems, such as dislocations, ligament injuries, and other lower limb fractures. Symptoms of a broken cuboid bone include bruising, tenderness, swelling, foot pain, instability, and difficulty bearing weight on the affected foot. If you are experiencing foot pain, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist. This foot and ankle specialist can diagnose your condition and find the best treatment for you.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about All About Cuboid Syndrome
Tuesday, 24 August 2021 00:00

Walking May Help With Symptoms of Arthritis

Research has suggested that walking may be one of the best methods to manage the symptoms of pain, stiffness, or inflammation that can coincide with arthritis. It is important to start off slowly by building a walking routine, and with some time and experience, it should become easier when performed every day. Walking can also be beneficial for losing weight which may help lessen the stress that the joints endure. Slowly increasing the frequency, intensity, and length of time that you walk is the preferred method and can help to alleviate the aches and pain from arthritis. Many patients find that counting how many steps they take every day can help track their daily progress for maximum benefits. If you have arthritis in your feet, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can offer you proper management techniques.

Arthritis can be a difficult condition to live with. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Arthritic Foot Care  

Arthritis is a term that is commonly used to describe joint pain.  The condition itself can occur to anyone of any age, race, or gender, and there are over 100 types of it.  Nevertheless, arthritis is more commonly found in women compared to men, and it is also more prevalent in those who are overweight. The causes of arthritis vary depending on which type of arthritis you have. Osteoarthritis for example, is often caused by injury, while rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a misdirected immune system.

Symptoms

  • Swelling
  • Pain
  • Stiffness
  • Decreased Range of Motion

Arthritic symptoms range in severity, and they may come and go. Some symptoms stay the same for several years but could potentially get worse with time. Severe cases of arthritis can prevent its sufferers from performing daily activities and make walking difficult.

Risk Factors

  • Occupation – Occupations requiring repetitive knee movements have been linked to osteoarthritis
  • Obesity – Excess weight can contribute to osteoarthritis development
  • Infection – Microbial agents can infect the joints and trigger arthritis
  • Joint Injuries – Damage to joints may lead to osteoarthritis
  • Age – Risk increases with age
  • Gender –Most types are more common in women
  • Genetics – Arthritis can be hereditary

If you suspect your arthritis is affecting your feet, it is crucial that you see a podiatrist immediately. Your doctor will be able to address your specific case and help you decide which treatment method is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Care for Your Arthritic Foot

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Tuesday, 17 August 2021 00:00

Sever’s Disease 101

Sever’s disease is an injury that causes pain in the back of the heel in patients between the ages of 8 and 15. this condition may be a result of a growth spurt when the muscles and tendons in the calves can not keep up with the growth rate of the bones. The tight muscles put more stress on the Achilles tendon particularly where it attaches to the heel bone. Sever’s disease is most common in active adolescents who do a lot of sports training or physical activity. The most common sign is pain in the back of the heel, but other signs of Sever’s disease include worsening pain with physical activity and pain that gets worse throughout the day. If your child is complaining about pain in their heels, consulting with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment is suggested.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Tuesday, 10 August 2021 00:00

Stress Fractures in the Front of the Foot

There are five long metatarsal bones in the front of the foot which connect the toes with the tarsal bones of the mid-and-hind-foot. These metatarsals bear a great deal of weight during walking, running and jumping, which makes them more susceptible to tiny cracks known as stress fractures. These stress fractures occur over time through repetitive activity which first weakens, and eventually cracks these metatarsals. Stress fractures in the metatarsals can be caused by osteoporosis or other activities that can weaken bones, irregular body mechanics (how the body moves), or a sudden change in physical activity. Symptoms of a stress fracture can include discomfort ranging from a dull ache to a sharp pain which may wax and wane, along with bruising or swelling. If you are experiencing pain in the front of your foot, or any part of your foot, a podiatrist can help diagnose and treat your condition.

Stress fractures occur when there is a tiny crack within a bone. To learn more, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain free and on your feet.

How Are They Caused?

Stress fractures are the result of repetitive force being placed on the bone. Since the lower leg and feet often carry most of the body’s weight, stress fractures are likely to occur in these areas. If you rush into a new exercise, you are more likely to develop a stress fracture since you are starting too much, too soon.  Pain resulting from stress fractures may go unnoticed at first, however it may start to worsen over time.

Risk Factors

  • Gender – They are more commonly found in women compared to men.
  • Foot Problems – People with unusual arches in their feet are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Certain Sports – Dancers, gymnasts, tennis players, runners, and basketball players are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Lack of Nutrients – A lack of vitamin D and calcium may weaken the bones and make you more prone to stress fractures
  • Weak Bones – Osteoporosis can weaken the bones therefore resulting in stress fractures

Stress fractures do not always heal properly, so it is important that you seek help from a podiatrist if you suspect you may have one. Ignoring your stress fracture may cause it to worsen, and you may develop chronic pain as well as additional fractures.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

A broken toe is not only painful, it can also be very inconvenient because the toes help with walking and balance. Common signs of a broken toe include the inability to walk, throbbing, bruising, swelling, redness, tenderness, or the toe appears crooked. While the toe bones are small, and a broken toe may seem minor, any toe fracture should be looked at by a podiatrist. If a broken toe is left untreated, complications such as long term pain, arthritis, permanent bone deformity, or an infection may occur. Upon visiting a podiatrist, they will be able to help provide a proper treatment method for the injury. Common treatment methods for a broken toe include icing, resting, buddy taping, or surgery, and in some cases, antibiotics may be necessary if an infection has occurred.  

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot Health Center of Merrimack Valley. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in North Andover, and Tewksbury, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
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